Posted by: timvanderveer | April 18, 2010

Recovering and talking like a pirate

Beautiful spring weather this weekend. Thanks to the ash cloud from the erupting Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland, we had the most amazing blue skies, without the normal signs of airplanes. Unique.

My body is recovering well after the marathon. Starting from wednesday the pains were gone. On thursday I did a careful 5 K, with lots of stretching and jogging. My legs still felt very feeble. But this weekend all went much better: two runs around 9K.

My oldest son, Tibor (5 years old), joined me on his bike. Cracking jokes, talking like a pirate and showing me his new stunts on his bike. Great!

This week I also contacted Jo Schoonbroodt, a Dutch runner who participated in the Annapurna100 and ran the whole way down with Rob. Still need to make an appointment with him, to learn about his travel stories and maybe do a run with him. I also spoke to the previous editor in chief of Runner’s World, who promised me to help me with my book.

And now, I am going to simply lay in bed and look silly tv. Despite this brilliant spring, I have got a cold and want to get rid of it as soon as possible. Remedy: rest.

Advertisements

Responses

  1. You know, our porter friend Sandeep was back at work a week later…… The psychology here is immense. They just seem to get on with it, no matter how tired. When Sandeep comes to Pokhara for training, the first thing I have for his is a week off and a massage, but I bet he will pick anything up and carry it somewhere instead.

  2. I understand what you mean. Seen this a lot in the poor countries that I have visited for Oxfam. I guess it has something to do with the urgent need to keep going, in order to survive. That beats the much less critical motivation of European (elite) runners. Interesting what you wrote about the Nepalese not seeing themselves as runners. Running in its original design: a way of transport. It’s funny: I love running somewhere for a purpose. For example: when bring the car the garage for maintenance, it’s always the question how to get back. I run.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

%d bloggers like this: